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Welcome to OzProblems.com, a site devoted to the chess problem art in Australia! Whether you’re a player who is new to composition chess or an experienced solver looking for challenging problems, we have something for you. Our aim is to promote the enjoyment of chess problems, which are at once interesting puzzles and the most artistic form of chess.

 Problem of the Week


236. H. W. Fitzell
Chess World 1946
Version
Mate in 2

The weekly problem’s solution will appear in the following week, when a new work is quoted.
See last week’s problem with solution: No.235.
See previous Problems of the Week without solutions: Page 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10.

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 Walkabout
Archives: 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013 | 2014
Chess and problem rambles by PW


17 May 2015 – What’s New


Bob Meadley’s important historical research has culminated in the publication of Australian Chess Problem History. This splendid document is now available for download in two parts. Bob has assembled a massive amount of interesting materials, sorted into the pre- and post-1962 eras. Part 1 contains, for example, mini-biographies of eminent composers since the late 19th century accompanied by their sample problems, and a detailed account of Fred Hawes’ work as “Australia’s greatest problem editor” over a 42-year period. Part 2 includes a “Chronological History of Australian Problems from 1962”, covering modern composers and more recent problem magazines and columns. There’s also a large “Photos and Scans” section, which helps you to associate the familiar names next to chess diagrams with human faces!

Below is a charming more-mover that Bob cited in the section on Fred Hawes. The white rook could threaten mate on the first rank in many ways, but what is the only move that will overcome Black’s stalemate-aiming defences? You can download Australian Chess Problem History using the links above or on the Problemists and History page of this site.

Frederick Hawes
The Australasian Chess Review 1941
Mate in 4

Another contribution to the Oz Archives comes from Nigel Nettheim, who again fills in a gap in our collection of chess problem columns. He has scanned all of the Australasian Chess Review columns for the year 1932, on problems as well as endgame studies. This material is spread over four PDF-files, reflecting the substantial coverage given to problems during that time. Check them out on the Magazines and Columns page.

Recently Nigel and I were discussing the issue of how to introduce players to the art of composing problems. Very few guides have been written on the subject, but Nigel has discovered a free e-book that deals with it in a clear and succinct manner. It’s Thomas Taverner’s Chess Problems Made Easy: How to Solve, How to Compose (1924), an electronic edition of which was published by Anders Thulin. Besides updating the text to algebraic notation, Anders has computer-tested all of the problems, so that unsound ones are noted as such.

Nigel has some reservations about the book that I share, regarding its textual and diagram errors (mostly originating from the printed edition) and how it’s dated in some respect, e.g. the invalid claim that castling is barred in problems. Nevertheless, the book is recommended for providing good and still pertinent advice to novice composers (see Chapter 4), and step-by-step instructions on how to construct a problem. That some of the resulting compositions turned out to be unsound does not reduce the value of the instructions. Indeed, Nigel points out that it would be a good exercise for readers to correct these faulty works. I offer a prize of my book, Parallel Strategy: 156 Chess Compositions, to any new (unpublished) composer who succeeds in producing such a correction. A good example of a cooked position that’s amenable to repairs is the two-mover that ends Chapter 5. Thanks to Anders who has given permission for this e-book to be placed on OzProblems.


25 Mar. 2015 – Australian Junior Chess Problem-Solving Championship


This year the national Junior Chess Championships took place in the capital city of Canberra, and an accompanying Problem-Solving competition was held on January 20th. Now in its ninth year, the solving event was successfully run by Nigel Nettheim and attracted 75 entrants (52 boys, 17 girls, and 6 adults). Nigel has put together an engaging Report on the event which you can access from this site. The Report details what transpired on the day and contains the question sheets and solutions, as well as a supplement guide on how to run such a contest. There is also a note requesting a transition to new control of this annual competition.

Arnoldo Ellerman
Olympic Tourney 1964
3rd Hon. Mention
Mate in 2

Leonardo Mano
(source unknown) 1999
Proof game in 4

The contestants were given two hours to tackle fifteen problems. The directmates were set by Geoff Foster, while Nigel proposed the endgame studies. These well-selected tasks range from the easy to some that are quite tough, so as to give any newcomers a chance while sorting out the best solvers. Here I quote two of the trickier problems from the paper – have a go at them! Check the Report to see if you have solved them correctly. To find out who were the prize-winners this year, go to the Problem Solving Results page of the official Championships site.

Incidentally, I have added a page called Solving and Composing Competitions to the Oz Archives section of this site. Here you can view the Reports of all the earlier junior solving events (previously accessible from the Links page), and also the documents relating to the recent Guided Composing competition.


22 Feb. 2015 – What’s New


We have a mixed bag of updates and new materials this month.

Bob Meadley continues his invaluable historical research on Australian chess problemists. He has put together two informative papers about some of our best-known composers, and also sent a third prepared by Ken Fraser:

Frank Ravenscroft and Frederick T. Hawes' Chess Problems
C.G.M. Watson: Chess Master, Insurance Officer and Problemist
Chess Problems by Henry Tate

The fecund partnership of Ravenscroft and Hawes had produced consistently high-quality works, and Bob has gathered these joint compositions in one accessible place. The current Problem of the Week (No.222) by the pair was picked from this album, which contains plenty of works that could have been lost otherwise. Watson's paper incorporates his biographical information, OTB chess activities, and a selection of his compositions. Below I quote a joke problem he published a century ago. Tate's problem collection was transcribed from his original notebooks by Ken Fraser, the late curator of the Anderson Chess Collection in the State Library of Victoria. Bob has added the diagrams and updated the solutions to algebraic notation. You can view or download these documents in the PDF format on the Problemists and History page of this site.

C.G.M. Watson
The Dux 1914
Mate in 1
‘A difficult problem, only to be solved by a solver
who is willing to put in a whole evening at the task.’

As promised in the previous column, Nigel Nettheim has completed his Report on the 2015 Guided Composing tourney. This is a very readable account that covers the conception and running of the new event. Check it out here: Guided Chess Problem Composing Competition Report.

Over the past few months I have been polishing the look of this website, primarily for users of hand-held devices. Previously the site's layout was quite messy when viewed on mobile phones with low screen resolutions; now it looks at least decent (though the site logo is still cut off and only half visible). One unexpected effect of fixing the more serious formatting issues is that, on small mobile screens, the chess diagrams have become variable in size depending on the amount of text next to them!


31 Jan. 2015 – Guided Chess Problem Composing Competition


The inaugural problem composing tourney linked to the 2015 Australian Junior Chess Championships has been completed. This event (announced in a previous column) aimed to encourage players and solvers to try their hand at constructing chess problems; some harder tasks, which were more suited to experienced composers, were also set. The final results were very close, and here are the prize winners:

1st Prize: Ilija Serafimović (Serbia)
2nd Prize: Ralf Krätschmer (Germany)
3rd Prize: Marko Lozajic (Serbia)

Congratulations to the winners, and thanks to all those who participated. At just ten years of age, the obviously talented Ilija managed to achieve a near-perfect score! Ralf is an established problemist, best-known for his more-movers. Marko is another junior who did very well. Both he and Ilija are students of the renowned Grandmaster of chess composition, Marjan Kovačević.

A document comprising the Tasks, Answers, and Results of the competition is now available for download. There you will find not only the "official" answers to the composing tasks, but also some of the contestants' alternative problem settings. Often I was surprised by these submitted positions – they illustrate the varied ways in which composers deal with the hurdles of construction.

Below I give the answer to the mate-in-three task that was reproduced in the October column. Only one contestant, Ilija, found this setting which is the most economical way of removing the 2.Kg6/Kg7 dual. After 1.Qg4! Ke5, only 2.Sc8+ works, leading to 2…Kd5 3.Se7 and 2…Kf6 3.Qg6, both model mates.

James Joseph Glynn
The Leader 1905, Version
Mate in 3

Nigel Nettheim will provide a Report on this composing event in due course, covering its organisational aspects.